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Don’t Let Hidden Hail Damage Ruin Your Property’s Roof

You might think that your roof looks fine, but it could be the victim of hidden hail damage. After all, more than 30 severe storms dropped one-inch hail or larger across DFW and East Texas, and that’s just since the beginning of this year. This is large enough to cause some serious roofing problems, and your property likely got hit.

“Oftentimes, you can’t see damage from the ground,” explained Stonewater Roofing senior sales representative Anayo Onyi, “and if you do see anything that looks like a disturbance, you can’t really identify it without being up on the roof.” So, there is only one sure way to make sure that hidden hail damage doesn’t become a major problem.

“Your next step is to have a qualified professional — Stonewater Roofing — come up and inspect the damage for you,” Onyi said.

Stonewater Roofing’s experts provide a complete health check of your property. “We look for primary and collateral damage. So, primary damage would be to the shingles themselves. Collateral damage is to soft metals, window screens, gutters and things like that,” Onyi said. “All that kind of just helps to paint a picture of what actually occurred and the extent of the damage.”

Inspecting your roof yourself is not recommended. First, you are likely not trained in how to spot damage. But most importantly, it can be very dangerous if you were to slip and fall. “It’s kind of a waste of time, unnecessary risk,” Onyi stated. “It’s best to have somebody that does that day in, day out come and give you a professional inspection.”

In just 15 minutes, you get the peace of mind that comes with knowing the status of your roof, and you’ll know what the next step is to staying protected. “If you don’t have any storm damage, great,” Onyi added. “But if there’s a potential issue that might cause a leak later down the line, then I’m going to point that out to you.”

Ready for your free damage assessment? Contact us today and make sure that your home or business is safe from the next storm.